How to Optimize Your Fitness at Every Age

Yes, you CAN optimize your age through fitness training to proactively address, and positively influence, some of the primary symptoms of aging. Yes, you CAN take ownership of the controllable components of aging such as, decreased memory function or exercise performance.

To get started, we tapped into physiologist and educator Angela Santoni, PhD to learn specific exercises and equipment that will help keep your brain, heart, bones and muscles healthy and boost your power and agility.

Optimizing Age is a concept developed by Angela Santoni, PhD. It considers the various systems of the human body that change as we age and how to address each system (muscle, heart, brain, bone) to achieve optimal health. Optimal health is the highest possible physical, mental, and social state with the lowest risk of developing future diseases.

“Optimal Age asks that we throw away the idea of accepting age as a fixed state and take ownership of the controllable components of aging. It’s not about turning back a clock, but it’s also not about settling in,” Santoni explains. “It’s about understanding the changes in your body based on age, and targeting the areas you can improve through exercise and nutrition.”

Let's get started - The benefits of Active Aging: Training Tips

For BRAIN HEALTH try BOXING EQUIPMENT

Exercise improves your cognitive health. Cognitive decline may begin as early as age of 30 and progressively worsens slowly and steadily. By 85 years of age, 50% of adults have Alzheimer's disease. Exercise training effects on cognition were largest when exercise training exceeded 30 min per session EVERY DAY at minimum of 50% of max however additional improvements are seen specifically as it relates to free radical damage at higher intensities.

For HEART & VASCULAR HEALTH: try the ALPINE RUNNER

The Alpine Runner offers a fantastic training experience for better heart and vascular health. You’ll get this kind of benefit from any fitness machine that offers a high level of power output – like a treadmill. This kind of exercise improves heart function and healthy insulin production. Commit to 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise daily at 75% of maximum intensity for best results.

For BONE HEALTH: try PLYO BOXES AND JUMP ROPES

Exercise is the key to strong bones.Exercise promotes healthy bone growth during bone growth years and can help stop or slow bone loss during bone loss years Slow bone loss begins through late 40’s and by age 55 rapid loss begins. Choose exercises with high ground reaction force (high impact) activity like plyometrics and jumping rope.

For MUSCLE STRENGTH: try VERSATILE STRENGTH PIECES (example: dumbbells)

Muscles break down as we get older. This can affect power, agility, balance and reaction time. After age 25 you’ll lose a ½ pound of muscle fiber annually. Add resistance training (and or yoga) minimum of 2 times per week using a variety of dynamic movements. This will improve protein synthesis, motor units and reverse mitochondrial dysfunction.

For POWER, AGILITY AND REACTION TIME: try KETTLEBELLS

Power is one of the MOST important elements in maintaining balance as you age. After age 20 your power decreases at a rate of 8.3% per decade at a much higher rate than strength. Try using kettlebells 1-3 sets of 6-10 repetitions at high velocity. Add in other forms of resistance training progressing from machines to free weights.

RECOVERY: try FOAM ROLLERS AND VIBRATION PIECES

As you age, the recovery process is the same but the timeframe is different. It takes a bit longer for your body to adapt and recover after you exercise. Try foam rolling, stretching and vibration therapy to help your body recover and rebuild after you train.

Our experts at Gym Source are here to help you train smart and stay strong as you get older. We have the information and fitness equipment you need to meet and crush your goals. Visit your local Gym Source fitness equipment showroom today to get started!

WHAT IS ACTIVE AGING?

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